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Home » Contact Lenses » Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses

Bifocal and Multifocal Contact Lenses

Bifocal and multifocal contact lenses are available in both soft and rigid gas permeable (GP) materials.

Bifocals, multifocals – What’s the difference?

Bifocal contacts lenses (like bifocal eyeglass lenses) have two powers – one for seeing clearly far away and one for seeing clearly up close. Multifocal contact lenses, like progressive eyeglass lenses, have a range of powers for seeing clearly far away, up close and everywhere in between. (“Multifocal” is also a catch-all term for all lenses with more than one power, including bifocals.)

Types of multifocal contact lenses

Based on design, there are basically two types of multifocal contact lenses:

  1. Simultaneous vision lenses. With these lenses, both distance and near zones of the lens are in front of your pupil at the same time. Although this might sound unworkable, after a short period of time your visual system learns to use the power you need and ignore the other lens power(s), depending on what you are looking at. Simultaneous vision lenses are the most popular type of multifocal contact lens. They are nearly always soft lenses, and are available in two designs:
    • Concentric ring designs – These are bifocal lenses with either the distance or near power in the center of the lens, with alternating rings of distance and near powers surrounding it.
    • Aspheric designs – These are progressive-style multifocal lenses, with many powers blended across the lens surface. Some aspheric lenses have the distance power in the center of the lens; others have the near power in the center.
  2. Alternating vision (or translating) lenses. These are GP multifocal lenses that are designed like bifocal eyeglass lenses. The top part of the lens has the distance power, and the bottom part of the lens contains the near power. When you look straight ahead, your eye is looking through the distance part of the lens. When you look down, your lower lid holds the lens in place while your pupil moves (translates) into the near zone of the lens for reading.

    Will multifocal contact lenses work for me?

    In monovision, you wear a single vision contact lens on one eye for your distance vision and a single vision contact lens on the other eye that has a prescription for your near vision. In modified monovision, you wear a single vision “distance lens” on one eye and a multifocal contact lens on the other eye to help you see better up close.

    To determine the best contact lenses for your vision needs when you reach “bifocal age,” call our office for a consultation.

 

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Personal Message from Drs. McRoberts, Bowden & Davidson regarding COVID-19

Considering the evolving situation of COVID-19, we feel it is our responsibility to prioritize the health of our community members during this critical time and do what we can to minimize the opportunity for transmission. As a result, we have made the decision to close our physical clinic and provide only virtual appointments & emergency referrals until further notice.

For Squamish patients, please call 604-892-5055 during our regular business hours to consult.
For West Vancouver patients, please call 604-922- 0413 during our regular business hours to consult.

We are here if you need us!

**Please note – we will continue to be available for your glasses, contacts, eye drops, ocular supplements and any other product or prescription needs. Please call and we can arrange to have these shipped directly to your door at no charge.

Thank you for your support and understanding as we navigate these unprecedented times. We are hopeful that this will be a temporary measure, and will be monitoring the situation carefully. Please take care of yourselves & each other, and we hope to see you soon!

Sincerely,
Drs. McRoberts, Bowden & Davidson